AndrewIhla

31 SPOOPY JAMS

Day Twenty: Alice Cooper - “He’s Back (The Man Behind the Mask)”

In which Alice Cooper gives the second-best performance of the entire Friday the 13th franchise (the first, of course, being Crispin Glover).

31 SPOOPY JAMS

Day Nineteen: Mick Smiley - “Magic”

I’ve always been way into this song, which you’ll recognize from the “ghost geyser” sequence in Ghostbusters, but I never knew it had a video until I went looking to post it here. Apparently, this video never got airplay, as Arista decided against releasing the song as a single. I can only guess it’s because the weird bisected structure with a hard tonal left turn at the halfway point wasn’t considered radio-friendly.

Mick Smiley is a bass player who was part of Billy Idol’s band in the ’80s. His only major songwriting credits are “Magic” and Lita Ford’s “Kiss Me Deadly”. So, he’s 2 for 2, I’d say.

criterionlaserdiscs:

Special Features
Scenes deleted from the final cut of the film
Split-screen demonstration of scenes before and after special effects
Photo essay illustrating the building of the sets and the monsters
The complete screenplay
The original theatrical trailer and teaser

criterionlaserdiscs:

Special Features

  • Scenes deleted from the final cut of the film
  • Split-screen demonstration of scenes before and after special effects
  • Photo essay illustrating the building of the sets and the monsters
  • The complete screenplay
  • The original theatrical trailer and teaser
criterionlaserdiscs:

Special Features:
Screen-specific audio commentary featuring writer/director/composer John Carpenter, writer/producer Debra Hill, and actress Jamie Lee Curtis
The original theatrical trailer
Separate music and effects track
Additional footage shot for the 1980 television release
Photo essay on the making, marketing, and mimicking of Halloween
Illustrated filmographies of John Carpenter, Donald Pleasence, and Jamie Lee Curtis
Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert give splatter movies the thumbs down while praising Halloween in a controversial 1980 Sneak Previews segment
Genre guide by John McCarty, author of Splatter Movies: Breaking the Last Taboo of the Screen, including capsule reviews of cold-blooded killer movies from The Bad Seed to Halloween

criterionlaserdiscs:

Special Features:

  • Screen-specific audio commentary featuring writer/director/composer John Carpenter, writer/producer Debra Hill, and actress Jamie Lee Curtis
  • The original theatrical trailer
  • Separate music and effects track
  • Additional footage shot for the 1980 television release
  • Photo essay on the making, marketing, and mimicking of Halloween
  • Illustrated filmographies of John Carpenter, Donald Pleasence, and Jamie Lee Curtis
  • Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert give splatter movies the thumbs down while praising Halloween in a controversial 1980 Sneak Previews segment
  • Genre guide by John McCarty, author of Splatter Movies: Breaking the Last Taboo of the Screen, including capsule reviews of cold-blooded killer movies from The Bad Seed to Halloween
That time Mignola got to draw Tom Waits a bunch.

That time Mignola got to draw Tom Waits a bunch.

Got these signed by Mignola a couple years ago. #halloweenreading

Got these signed by Mignola a couple years ago. #halloweenreading

31 SPOOPY JAMS

Day Eighteen: Froggy Fresh (a.k.a. Krispy Kreme) - “Halloween”

…and this year, the terror continues.

Today!

Today!

6 plays

31 SPOOPY JAMS

Day Seventeen: Franz Waxman - “Dance Macabre”

The art of the film score was still in its relative infancy in 1937, when James Whale released his genre-defying sequel, The Bride of Frankenstein. While Whale’s 1931 original Frankenstein had no music at all (which very much adds to that film’s creepy atmosphere), Bride's further heightening of reality and flirtations with camp (before “camp” was even a thing) called for a little mood-setting.

Enter screen music legend Franz Waxman, whose score for Bride was ahead of its time in its use of motifs, themes, and ironic juxtaposition. “Dance Macabre”, Waxman’s theme for the fabulous Dr. Septimus Pretorius, was loosely based on Saint-Saëns’ “Danse Macabre” and is a perfect, loopy fit for the character.

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